Corduroy

Corduroy Corduroy was first published in It was followed by Silver Ley in and The Cherry Tree in Together they form a trilogy that has been described as the classic account of a twentieth centur

  • Title: Corduroy
  • Author: Adrian Bell
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 111
  • Format: Paperback
  • Corduroy was first published in 1930 It was followed by Silver Ley in 1931 and The Cherry Tree in 1932 Together they form a trilogy that has been described as the classic account of a twentieth century Englishman s conversion to rural life In Corduroy the author s experiences as a farm apprentice in Suffolk are described The tone is affectionate, humourous and not inCorduroy was first published in 1930 It was followed by Silver Ley in 1931 and The Cherry Tree in 1932 Together they form a trilogy that has been described as the classic account of a twentieth century Englishman s conversion to rural life In Corduroy the author s experiences as a farm apprentice in Suffolk are described The tone is affectionate, humourous and not in the least patronizing At times there is an elegiac strain not dissimilar to Edward Thomas The three books constitute a threnody for, what was then, a vanishing, pre mechanized way, of farming and rural life.

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      Published :2020-08-14T10:19:54+00:00

    About " Adrian Bell "

  • Adrian Bell

    Adrian Bell is one of the best known of modern writers dealing with the countryside His books are noted for their close observations of country life.The son of a newspaper editor, Bell was born in London and educated at Uppingham School in Rutland At the age of 19 he ventured into the countryside in Hundon, Suffolk, to learn about agriculture, and he farmed in various locations over the next sixty years, including the rebuilding of a near derelict 89 acre smallholding at Redisham.

  • 469 Comments

  • For anyone interested in farm life in the 20's, this book is a treasure. For me, this book was all kinds of things I like thrown in the pot and called supper. The main thing - Adrian is great. Coming from a city background as he does, he puts himself into the role of farmer's apprentice with all good will and positivity. And Mr. Colville, his mentor (all the considerable number of Colvilles, in fact) it was not difficult to see that Adrian would have a case of hero-worship for him - energetic, e [...]


  • I have a lot of Suffolk blood in me, and call this part of the world my "second home" so when I found out that Adrian Bell had written a trilogy of life in this rural part of England, I snapped them up! My Uncles all have large farms in this area, so these books were of especial interest to me.In Corduroy, Adrian shares his experiences in moving from the bustling, pretentious metropolis of London to the farming life in Suffolk, and working as an apprentice on the Colville farm. From having the w [...]


  • This is a book written by a man who went from a life of flapper dissipation to learning the ropes of farming from a man who had done it all his life. Bell's parents wanted him to stop fooling around and do something with his life. He wanted to work outside, and he wound up with an old-fashioned farmer. At this time in England (the 1920s), the old ways were still common, and the impending changes of the post-war revolution were merely a flicker in the eyes of the people. Bell describes windmills [...]



  • This is by way of a public service. I stumbled over several references recently to this book and decided to hunt it down. "Hunt" is the right word, though of course that's not so hard these days. It seems to have gone out of print in the late 80s (I may be wrong about that, but the used paperback copy that I found on the Internet was itself a revival with a foreword noting how awful it was that such a great book had been allowed to drop out of print). I resorted to ADDALL Used books (which is an [...]


  • This books captures time and place perfectly but from the point of view a person involved (Adrian Bell lived and worked on a farm just after the First World War)as well as an outside observer who gradually learns more of the ways of the countryside. It is not simply a series of anecdotes nor does it present itself as a grand description of nature, but it has elements of both of these. He never looks down on his colleagues, in fact he's the one that feels like an idiot a lot of the time compared [...]


  • Silly to be reading this beautiful old book on the KINDLE app on my iphone - but there you have it, modern Life. Wonderful to have it nearby and sneak a few pages now and thencommended in their monthly online newsletter by my favorite book shop on earth, Slightly Foxed in London.



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