Granta 112: Pakistan

Granta Pakistan Packed with almost million people speaking nearly sixty languages brought into nationhood under the auspices of a single religion but wracked with deep separatist fissures and the destabilizing

  • Title: Granta 112: Pakistan
  • Author: John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto
  • ISBN: 9781905881215
  • Page: 432
  • Format: Paperback
  • Packed with almost 200 million people speaking nearly sixty languages, brought into nationhood under the auspices of a single religion, but wracked with deep separatist fissures and the destabilizing forces of ongoing conflicts in Iran, Afghanistan and Kashmir, Pakistan is one of the most dynamic places in the world today.From the writers who are living outside the countryPacked with almost 200 million people speaking nearly sixty languages, brought into nationhood under the auspices of a single religion, but wracked with deep separatist fissures and the destabilizing forces of ongoing conflicts in Iran, Afghanistan and Kashmir, Pakistan is one of the most dynamic places in the world today.From the writers who are living outside the country Daniyal Mueenuddin, Kamila Shamsie and Nadeem Aslam to those going back Mohsin Hamid and Mohammed Hanif to those who are living there and writing in Urdu, Punjabi, Sindhi, Baluchi and English, there is a startling opportunity to draw together an exciting collection of voices at the forefront of a literary renaissance.Granta 112 Pakistan will seize this moment, bringing to life the landscape and culture of the country in fiction, reportage, memoir, travelogue and poetry Like the magazine s issues on India and Australia, its release will be a watershed moment critically and a chance to celebrate the corona of talent which has burst onto the English language publishing world in recent years.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ Granta 112: Pakistan | by ✓ John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto
      432 John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ Granta 112: Pakistan | by ✓ John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto
      Posted by:John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto
      Published :2020-010-22T12:43:07+00:00

    About " John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto "

  • John Freeman Green Cardamom Declan Walsh Hasina Gul Mohsin Hamid Kamila Shamsie Aamer Hussein Fatima Bhutto

    Note There is than one author in the database with this name.John Freeman is an award winning writer and book critic who has written for numerous publications, including The New Yorker, The New York Times Book Review, The Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, and The Wall Street Journal Freeman won the 2007 James Patterson Pageturner Award for his work as the president of the National Book Critics Circle, and was the editor of Granta from 2009 to 2013 He lives in New York City, where he teaches at NYU and edits a new literary biannual called Freeman s.

  • 510 Comments

  • The autumn 2010 issue of this quarterly periodical from the UK features pieces about Pakistan, most by Pakistanis. The cover artwork is strikingly colorful and arresting. The writings vary from works of fiction to poetry, visual art, history, and current affairs. I was entranced by almost all of them. Perhaps the best was a short story by Nadeem Aslam entitled, “Leila in the Wilderness,” a work of great imagination and akin to the magical realism of Salman Rushdie. Jane Perlez’s article ab [...]


  • I think everyone needs to read this. No, really. This small but dense volume brings home the realities, the hopes and dreams, the desperation, the creativity, the complexity of modern Pakistan in a way that lurid news stories about "Islamization" and the Taliban never can. It contains a myriad of explorations--fictional, journalistic, poetic, artistic--of what it means to be Pakistani. It was at times frightening, at times inspiring, but I came out of it feeling like I have a much greater unders [...]


  • When I began the first story in this issue, Nadeem Aslam's "Leila in the Wilderness," it felt eerily familiar. It happens that I had recently read Krupabai Satthianadhan's Kamala: The Story of a Hindu Child-Wife, a relentlessly grim 19th century realist novel about a child-bride oppressed by her husband's family. Though Leila is Muslim, rather than Hindu, the story began the same way -- a bride in her early teens, beaten for producing girl babies (who mysteriously disappear) and continually brow [...]


  • Memorable QuotesLeila in the Wilderness – Nadeem Aslam “The divide wasn’t just on the surface: an ‘underground wall’ – delving to the depth of fifteen feet – kept the dishonourable corpses separate from the honourable ones.”“The strength with which a molar holds on to the jaw when you have it extracted is as nothing to the strength with which the soul is attached to the body. When they begin to tear away from each other, the torment is unbearable.”“Allah in His wisdom gave [...]


  • Interesting issue of Granta. When I started reading it, I was irritated by the characters of the mother and son in the first story, Leila in the Wilderness, so much so that I had to abandon the issue for a period of time. However, when I came back to begin reading the issue again, the story picked up its pace and proved more interesting with its mystical realism-like ending although those two characters continued to be so corrupt, self-serving, downright evil through out the remainder of the sto [...]


  • I read the first piece, "Leila in the Wilderness" by Nadeem Aslam, last. It is a beautiful piece of magical realism whose story harkened back to the pieces, fiction, memoir and reporting, I'd read before. I guess if I read the Granta from beginning to end, it would have foreshadowed the pieces that followed. This was a collection of works, prose, poetry and graphic arts that offered a deep look into Pakistan. I was engrossed.


  • This "magazine" consists of several talented authors, commentators and journalists. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this mix of writing voices and mediums. It's a great way to learn some about Pakistan and the region. I will say that Nadeem Aslam remains my wholehearted favorite. His writing, on so many levels, is pure joy and makes reading an absolute perfect activity.


  • My favorite was "Ice, Mating" by Uzma Aslam Khan. I had read her novels Trespassing and The Geometry of God already; after reading this, I remain a true fan. (Some of the art in this granta edition was nice too.)



  • I've only read "The Beheading," a harrowing short story. Love the photography and the colorful artwork on the cover. Need to read more.


  • Fabulous anthology of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art. The inferior pieces are balanced by overpowering stories and accounts. A must-read for anyone with an interest in South Asian writing.


  • I enjoyed this issue of Granta way more than expected. This year I've been doing ok at expanding my reading horizons a bit further beyond my beloved American literature and I think this Granta came at the right moment.This issue has too many pieces that I liked. So, at the risk of not narrowing down enough, here we go with my long list of special mentions:- Leila in the Wilderness by Nadeem Aslam -- Opening short story of the issue. Also how I got to know Aslam for the first time.- Portrait of J [...]


  • Fascinating anthology. 'Leila in The Wilderness' touched a cord within me about the backwardness of obstetrical practice in countries like India and Pakistan where superstition still has most poeple tightly in its grip. The very fact that the characters don't know (or won't believe) that the gender of the new-born infant depends solely upon the man's ejaculation demonstrates the backwardness of their highly-chauvinistic belief system. The story on the Sheedi community by Fatima Bhutto also left [...]


  • The Granta collection is a carefully edited, multi-facet read. It includes stories and essay, poetry and photography. And the cheerful, colorful cover itself gives the read a different tune, even though some of the stories are painful and tragic. But it also includes an amazing story about the mountains of Pakistan: "Ice, Mating" by Uzma Aslam Khan, about creating a glacier: ""After five winters, the ice blocks - one male, one female - would begin to creep downhill, growing into a natural glacie [...]


  • The subscription was a very welcome Christmas present (thanks, Mum) I very much like the idea of a collection of writings: fiction, non-fiction, poetry and photo-journalism, around a common theme. The highlights included the short story about a young woman kept as a virtual prisoner by a Machiavellian local politician, stories of Pakistan's pre-Al Haq pop scene(an aspect of the country I knew absolutely nothing of) and the poem about a plane coming in to land. Moreover, nothing in this edition r [...]


  • Wonderful selection of work, mainly by Pakistani writers but also a few pieces by writers familiar with Pakistan. Many of the authors are well-known but there are several unknowns, as well as some translations.



  • Wow. Is there any 'happy' Pakistani literature? This book needed at least one story that had a pleasant/'feel good' ending. (I suppose one of the biographical pieces ended well.)






  • Post Your Comment Here

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *