GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation

GI Jews How World War II Changed a Generation Whether they came from Sioux Falls or the Bronx over half a million Jews entered the U S armed forces during the Second World War Uprooted from their working and middle class neighborhoods they join

  • Title: GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation
  • Author: Deborah Dash Moore
  • ISBN: 9780674021020
  • Page: 275
  • Format: Paperback
  • Whether they came from Sioux Falls or the Bronx, over half a million Jews entered the U.S armed forces during the Second World War Uprooted from their working and middle class neighborhoods, they joined every branch of the military and saw action on all fronts Deborah Dash Moore offers an unprecedented view of the struggles these GI Jews faced, having to battle not onlWhether they came from Sioux Falls or the Bronx, over half a million Jews entered the U.S armed forces during the Second World War Uprooted from their working and middle class neighborhoods, they joined every branch of the military and saw action on all fronts Deborah Dash Moore offers an unprecedented view of the struggles these GI Jews faced, having to battle not only the enemy but also the prejudices of their fellow soldiers.Through memoirs, oral histories, and letters, Moore charts the lives of fifteen young Jewish men as they faced military service and tried to make sense of its demands From confronting pork chops to enduring front line combat, from the temporary solace of Jewish worship to harrowing encounters with death camp survivors, we come to understand how these soldiers wrestled with what it meant to be an American and a Jew.Moore shows how military service in World War II transformed this generation of Jews, reshaping Jewish life in America and abroad These men challenged perceptions of Jews as simply victims of the war, and encouraged Jews throughout the diaspora to fight for what was right At the same time, service strengthened Jews identification with American democratic ideals, even as it confirmed the importance of their Jewish identity GI Jews is a powerful, intimate portrayal of the costs of a conflict that was at once physical, emotional, and spiritual, as well as its profound consequences for these hitherto overlooked members of the greatest generation.

    • [PDF] ↠ Free Read ↠ GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation : by Deborah Dash Moore ✓
      275 Deborah Dash Moore
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ↠ Free Read ↠ GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation : by Deborah Dash Moore ✓
      Posted by:Deborah Dash Moore
      Published :2020-07-21T09:59:04+00:00

    About " Deborah Dash Moore "

  • Deborah Dash Moore

    Deborah Dash Moore born 1946, in New York City is the former Director of the Frankel Center for Judaic Studies and a Frederick G.L Huetwell Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan.Moore taught for many years at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York While there she served intermittently as head of Religious Studies and helped found a program in Jewish Studies At Vassar, Deborah Dash Moore wrote and co edited numerous books, articles and collections She was a highly regarded educator and classroom professor in addition to her scholarship.Her first book, At Home in America Second Generation New York Jews 1981 , explores how the children of immigrants created an ethnic world that blended elements of Jewish and American culture into a vibrant urban society To the Golden Cities Pursuing the American Jewish Dream in Miami and L A 1994 follows those big city Jews who chose to move to new homes after World War II and examines the type of communities and politics that flourished in these rapidly growing centers.Issues of leadership, authority and accomplishment have also engaged her attention, first in B nai B rith and the Challenge of Ethnic Leadership 1981 , and recently in the award winning two volume Jewish Women in America An Historical Encyclopedia 1997 , which she edited with Paula Hyman.Her 2004 book, GI Jews How World War II Changed a Generation, charts the lives of fifteen young Jewish men as they faced military service and tried to make sense of its demands, simultaneously wrestling with what it meant to be an American and a Jew GI Jews, a Washington Post Best Book of the Year, is a powerful, intimate portrayal of the costs of a conflict that was at once physical, emotional, and spiritual.In 2008, Moore published American Jewish Identity Politics University of Michigan , a collection of essays by such notable Jewish studies scholars as Hasia Diner, Jonathan Sarna, and Paula Hyman.In 2011, her book Gender Jewish History Indiana University Press , written with co editor Marion Kaplan in honor of historian Paula Hyman, was awarded the National Jewish Book Award in the category of Anthologies and Collections.In September 2012, NYU Press published a three volume series edited by Moore, City of Promises A History of the Jews of New York This history was selected for the National Jewish Book Award.

  • 486 Comments

  • My husband handed me this book during our browsing expedition at Half-Price Books. I thought he handed it to me as a suggestion for me to purchase. Turns out, he was buying it for himself!In any case, it was an interesting read about the experiences of American Jews in the Armed Forces during World War II. The author had interviewed about a dozen men, mostly from New York. She asked about their reasons for enlisting, their experiences during basic training and then there war time service. I was [...]


  • According to Moore, the idea of a Judeo-Christian tradition came about directly from the effort to integrate the Catholic, Jewish, and various Protestant soldiers during WWII. These days, it feels like that concept has always existed, but it interesting to see just how recent an invention it is.Overall, the information in the book was interesting, but the organization seemed weak to me.


  • In this book Deborah Dash Moore attempts to use biographical accounts of around a dozen Jewish New Yorkers to illustrate the seismic shift in identity and belonging that Jewish Americans experienced during the Second World War. Moore argues that prior to the war Jews were seen as outside of the state in many cases, often caricatured as untrustworthy and unpatriotic. However their involvement on the front lines in WWII dramatically shifted their identity from within and the nation’s perception [...]


  • This is an excellent book on the experiences of 15 young Jewish men serving in the military during World War II. It traces their evolution from living in isolated Jewish enclaves in areas such as Brooklyn and the Bronx, though their entry into the military and their service in Europe and the Pacific. Often initially treated as curiousities, they had to frequently overcome anti-Semitic prejudices, and at times they would have to wonder why they were dealing with 'enemies' wearing US military unif [...]


  • I did not realize I was so ignorant about antisemitism until I had finished this book.Yes I know plenty about World War II, but the external and internal conflicts of the Jewish solider had never been conveyed to me as a terribly important part of the story.Though the book relies heavily on oral retellings and Moore goes as far as to interview her own father (showing a huge bias and thus making her seem less scholarly to me), the book does achieve a frank realism that had been missing from my kn [...]


  • This book was a fast read. However, it is a bit fragmented as it tends to follow a group of Brooklyn Jews. Various anecdotes are told of their Jewish lives in the military. There is very little attempt to put those stories into the tapestry of the whole WWII campaign. The over arching theme is how the military service turned these Jews into Zionists. I have no doubt there is more substance to the stories of each of these individuals but it was missing from the book.


  • A truly fascinating look into the life of Jewish soldiers during World War II. Moore recounts the stories of soldiers who were forced to eat pork, liberated concentration camps, and many other harrowing and life-changing experiences.This is a highly recommended must-read for anyone interested in Jewish studies, Holocaust studies, and/or World War II studies.


  • Post Your Comment Here

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *