The Peabody Sisters of Salem

The Peabody Sisters of Salem The Peabody Sisters of Salem is a classic biography illuminating one of the most fascinating periods of American history the intellectual flowering of New England the golden age of such figures as Ha

  • Title: The Peabody Sisters of Salem
  • Author: Louise Hall Tharp
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 331
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Peabody Sisters of Salem is a classic biography illuminating one of the most fascinating periods of American history the intellectual flowering of New England, the golden age of such figures as Hawthorne, Thoreau, Channing, Emerson, Mann and Melville Louise Hall Tharp writes Louis Auchincloss in his introduction to this edition limns this era of seething intellThe Peabody Sisters of Salem is a classic biography illuminating one of the most fascinating periods of American history the intellectual flowering of New England, the golden age of such figures as Hawthorne, Thoreau, Channing, Emerson, Mann and Melville Louise Hall Tharp writes Louis Auchincloss in his introduction to this edition limns this era of seething intellects in the vision of three sisters, each unlike the other two The result is a brilliant assessment of the role of women in that time and place The Peabody sisters were at the hub of this whirlwind All three taught school, a commitment reflected at all stages of their lives Elizabeth Peabody, the oldest, is known as the founder of kindergarten in the United States She worked as Channing s secretary for several years, unpaid and unacknowledged, and published the Dial, which Emerson edited She ran the famous bookshop on Boston s West Street, where Hawthorne, Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Alcott and others gathered to discuss issues and literature of the time Her enthusiasm and vigor were so memorable Henry James used her as his model for Miss Birdseye in the Bostonians Like her sister Elizabeth, Mary was a teacher and naturally attracted to that great man of education, Horace Mann But while it was Elizabeth whose long intimate conversations with Mann often resulted in her combing his hair, it was Mary who married him and went west with him to help found Antioch College Their poignant love story is told with the sensitivity and humor that mark all of the sisters None of the sisters was sensitive or creatively talented than Sophia, whose frailty was marked by a series of ailments As a painter, her primary activity was the scrupulously detailed reproduction of other painters works But she was an intellectual and spiritual match for her husband, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and she supported him through the days of poverty and denigration as well as the times of genius and acclaim.

    • Free Read [Crime Book] ↠ The Peabody Sisters of Salem - by Louise Hall Tharp ✓
      331 Louise Hall Tharp
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Crime Book] ↠ The Peabody Sisters of Salem - by Louise Hall Tharp ✓
      Posted by:Louise Hall Tharp
      Published :2020-07-06T06:00:17+00:00

    About " Louise Hall Tharp "

  • Louise Hall Tharp

    Louise Hall Tharp Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Peabody Sisters of Salem book, this is one of the most wanted Louise Hall Tharp author readers around the world.

  • 658 Comments

  • The Peabody Sisters of Salem by Louisa Hall Tharp was a 1950s book I picked up after reading Erika Robuck's House of Hawthorne last year. The Peabody sisters included Sophia, who married Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mary who married Horace Mann, and Elizabeth who brought kindergarten to America. The women had great intellect and drive, and allied themselves with some of the movers and shakers of their time. They hobnobbed with all the Transcendentalists--Alcott, Emerson, Thoreau.All three sisters worked [...]


  • Written in the 1950s about events from 1830 to 1890. Based on facts. Mostly from old letters made by the Peabody sisters during that period. Well it was fascinating , to read about all the people those sisters lives were involved in over those years. It is a small world today but goodness how much smaller it was 180 years ago. I had put off reading this book for many years as I thought it was about witchcraft in Salem. Well, what a surprise it was to find it to be about all the people of those d [...]


  • I found myself comparing the Peabodys (Unitarians in Massachusetts) to Lucrecia Mott (Quaker in Nantucket). There is mention of Mary (Peabody) Mann meeting Lucrecia Mott. The dynamics of the relationship of sisters is interesting and familiar. It is difficult to write a biography of three people at once, along with all of their intimate friends who became famous. Interesting and difficult times to live in, but exciting.


  • This book, written in the 1050s, is much better than the recently published fictional book about Sophia Peabody. The three sisters, Elizabeth, Mary and Sophia, knew most of the existentialists, authors and educators of New England before, during and after the Civil War.


  • This book really caught my interest when I read it. Sophia Peabody married Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mary Peabody married Horace Mann, and Elizabeth Peabody opened the first English language kindergarten in the U.S. I went on to read several other Tharp biographies and enjoyed them all.


  • I have no idea where this book came from, but it appears to be a First Edition. It's not in very good shape though, and it's an author nobody ever heard of I doubt I will ever read it. I wish we didn't have to choose among read, to-read, and currently-reading. Some books I just own and collect with no intention of reading!


  • It's a "clean" read in that it presents the sisters and their circle in a highly positive light. However it is an interesting read covering a unique perspective and period.Finally finished. This is a very dry read, though it still manages to invoke an interesting time in history.


  • Written more like a dissertation than a novel; author repeats same or similar information too many times. Could have been half the number of pages!


  • Cheerful period piece written by "Mrs. Tharp" in the '50's. Far less research than the Marshall bk, but lots more vinegar.


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