The Ghost-Feeler: Stories of Terror and the Supernatural

The Ghost Feeler Stories of Terror and the Supernatural Readers of The Buccaneers The House of Mirth and the recently filmed The Age of Innocence may be surprised to learn that Edith Wharton known for her elegant narrative style described herself as so

  • Title: The Ghost-Feeler: Stories of Terror and the Supernatural
  • Author: Edith Wharton Peter Haining
  • ISBN: 9780720609967
  • Page: 312
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Readers of The Buccaneers, The House of Mirth, and the recently filmed The Age of Innocence may be surprised to learn that Edith Wharton, known for her elegant narrative style, described herself as someone with an intense Celtic sense of the supernatural As a ghost feeler , she wrote a number of chilling tales that objectify this sense of unease, even terror With themReaders of The Buccaneers, The House of Mirth, and the recently filmed The Age of Innocence may be surprised to learn that Edith Wharton, known for her elegant narrative style, described herself as someone with an intense Celtic sense of the supernatural As a ghost feeler , she wrote a number of chilling tales that objectify this sense of unease, even terror With themes of vampirism, isolation and hallucination, they reflect the author s internalized fears and her unhappy experience with marriage Some of these nine stories appeared in magazines and one, The Duchess at Prayer , is published again, for the first time since the nineteenth century.

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      312 Edith Wharton Peter Haining
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      Published :2020-04-27T10:57:32+00:00

    About " Edith Wharton Peter Haining "

  • Edith Wharton Peter Haining

    Edith Newbold Jones was born into such wealth and privilege that her family inspired the phrase keeping up with the Joneses The youngest of three children, Edith spent her early years touring Europe with her parents and, upon the family s return to the United States, enjoyed a privileged childhood in New York and Newport, Rhode Island Edith s creativity and talent soon became obvious By the age of eighteen she had written a novella, as well as witty reviews of it and published poetry in the Atlantic Monthly.After a failed engagement, Edith married a wealthy sportsman, Edward Wharton Despite similar backgrounds and a shared taste for travel, the marriage was not a success Many of Wharton s novels chronicle unhappy marriages, in which the demands of love and vocation often conflict with the expectations of society Wharton s first major novel, The House of Mirth, published in 1905, enjoyed considerable literary success Ethan Frome appeared six years later, solidifying Wharton s reputation as an important novelist Often in the company of her close friend, Henry James, Wharton mingled with some of the most famous writers and artists of the day, including F Scott Fitzgerald, Andr Gide, Sinclair Lewis, Jean Cocteau, and Jack London.In 1913 Edith divorced Edward She lived mostly in France for the remainder of her life When World War I broke out, she organized hostels for refugees, worked as a fund raiser, and wrote for American publications from battlefield frontlines She was awarded the French Legion of Honor for her courage and distinguished work.The Age of Innocence, a novel about New York in the 1870s, earned Wharton the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1921 the first time the award had been bestowed upon a woman Wharton traveled throughout Europe to encourage young authors She also continued to write, lying in her bed every morning, as she had always done, dropping each newly penned page on the floor to be collected and arranged when she was finished Wharton suffered a stroke and died on August 11, 1937 She is buried in the American Cemetery in Versailles, France Barnesandnoble

  • 297 Comments

  • The Ghost-Feeler Stories of Terror and the Supernatural is an anthology of ghost/supernatural stories written by Edith Wharton. The collection includes both chilling and even comedic stories. Her supernatural tales include ghosts, the dead walking, simple murder, psychological tales, and more. In each story I was struck with Wharton’s ability to weave vivid detail and imagery to create an unforgettable scene, such as in this description of a person dying: At last even these dim sensations spen [...]


  • Edith Wharton is such a lovely writer. Her sentences are perfect - just exactly the right number of words, no more and no less. This collection of stories is deliciously creepy. They aren't stories of "terror" like the book jacket says - they are stories in which the super-natural is as real as any other character. The supernatural element is completely real to the people experiencing it, so it's not hard to suspend disbelief. There are stories that are reminiscent of Poe or of James's Turn of t [...]


  • Why didn't my sophomore English teacher have me read these instead of stupid Ethan Frome? Not only are these my favorite pieces written by Wharton, but these are among my favorite ghost stories. You can really feel the eerie, understated influence of Henry James on these stories in as diverse settings as North Africa and New Hampshire. Some of the creeping discomfort that we associate most with Scottish or Welsh ghost stories are now--wonder!--transplanted to even America. I'm so pleased. Only o [...]


  • I found a few of these kind of confusing, but there were a few I really liked. The vampire story is one of the better ones I've read, and 'A Bottle of Perrier' was both gruesome and hilarious and the final story of the collection had a line that really stuck out:'After all, I thought, these people don't know what real trouble is; but they've manufactured something so like it that it's about as bad as the genuine thing.'


  • Edith Wharton brings her skillful touch to stories that are alternately scary, psychologically deft, and even funny. Not just well-written genre fiction -- which, ahhh! I'm so happy -- but sound, intricate short stories worth reading.


  • Interesting, especially after reading The Turn of the Screw, Henry James was one of Wharton's idols and mentors. The stories were creative and psychological, but sometimes leave too much to the imagination. Not a bad read.


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