The Camel of Destruction

The Camel of Destruction Cairo Captain Owen The Mamur Zapt is the head of Egypt s Political CID in the heyday of British Rule He is ultimately responsible for law and order in the Khedive s Cairo When the rules wheth

  • Title: The Camel of Destruction
  • Author: Michael Pearce
  • ISBN: 9781590580240
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Cairo, 1910 Captain Owen, The Mamur Zapt, is the head of Egypt s Political CID in the heyday of British Rule He is ultimately responsible for law and order in the Khedive s Cairo When the rules, whether obvious or hidden, are flouted, he steps into action although it sometimes looks like he s merely stepped sideways, out of the way.Now it is the end of the boom, leavingCairo, 1910 Captain Owen, The Mamur Zapt, is the head of Egypt s Political CID in the heyday of British Rule He is ultimately responsible for law and order in the Khedive s Cairo When the rules, whether obvious or hidden, are flouted, he steps into action although it sometimes looks like he s merely stepped sideways, out of the way.Now it is the end of the boom, leaving banks beleaguered and borrowers in trouble whether the poorest land working fellahin or the richest land owning Pashas Then a civil servant suspiciously dies at his desk The whiff of corruption is in the air Even Owen, supposed to be investigating the affair, appears to be living beyond his means As he turns to such unlikely allies as the Grand Mufti, the local barber, and the Widow Shawquat, he penetrates to the heart of such sinister organizations as the Khedive s Agricultural Society The rich are tricky, and money speaks louder than words, challenging Owen to use all his skills to stop the Camel of Destruction

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      Published :2020-07-08T07:21:44+00:00

    About " Michael Pearce "

  • Michael Pearce

    Michael Pearce grew up in the then Anglo Egyptian Sudan He returned there later to teach, and retains a human rights interest in the area He has recently retired from his academic post to write full time.

  • 556 Comments

  • An entertaining and humorous mystery, but one which takes patience to get into as it takes several chapters before you begin to understand who people are and what is going on. Some of this may have been because I started at the seventh book in the series, but I think most of it is just the authors style. I found the politics confusing to the end, but I really enjoyed the sly quiet sense of humor and will probably try more from this series.


  • Originally published on my blog here in June 2001.The camel of destruction is apparently a figure from Arab legend, which has an aptly descriptive name. In this novel, more serious in tone than most of the Mamur Zapt stories, a plan to build new roads right through ancient parts of the city of Cairo is likened to the camel.The case which Owen, as Mamur Zapt in charge of order in the city of Cairo in the early part of the twentieth century, investigates is the suicide of a civil servant, trying t [...]


  • How can anyone not like the Mamur Zapt series? Dry clever wit, hilarious and unusual tales from Egypt under British rule at the turn of the century (19th -20thC)and very well written. I particularly enjoy Michael Pearce's ability to write humourous dialogue. The Camel of Destruction always makes me cheer. Poor Gareth, the Mamur Zapt, might find himself torn between his job under British rule and the needs of Egypt but here he is able to use the best of both to stop the destruction. The series is [...]


  • Loved this one. Review to come. (I have approximately three dozen pages dog-eared for quotes and will need some time to make choices in the interest of not writing a review that exceeds the length of the reviewed work.)


  • It isn't that it was badly written but I found it incredibly confusing. I thought I maybe should have started with the first book in the series so at least I would have known who the characters are.


  • My least favorite in the series so far, probably because there just wasn't enough Zeinab or Mahmoud. Owen's relationships with the two of them are just so fun. On to The Snake Catcher's Daughter . . .


  • Equal parts of political satire, history, and murder mystery. Funny and engaging, it was a pleasure to read. At times, the reader may need some understanding of the historical setting to follow the story line.




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