Pushkin House

Pushkin House No other contemporary novel provides such clear insight into the Russian mind and way of life as Andrei Bitov s Pushkin House First published in the United States in and highly praised for its in

  • Title: Pushkin House
  • Author: Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov
  • ISBN: 9780002710886
  • Page: 479
  • Format: Paperback
  • No other contemporary novel provides such clear insight into the Russian mind and way of life as Andrei Bitov s Pushkin House First published in the United States in 1987 and highly praised for its inventiveness, Pushkin House is a contemporary literary masterpiece Though the novel s focus is a love affair between Lyova and Faina, the novel s true subject is an investigaNo other contemporary novel provides such clear insight into the Russian mind and way of life as Andrei Bitov s Pushkin House First published in the United States in 1987 and highly praised for its inventiveness, Pushkin House is a contemporary literary masterpiece Though the novel s focus is a love affair between Lyova and Faina, the novel s true subject is an investigation of the corruption of Soviet intellectual life and history Working within many of the confines imposed upon him during the Soviet regime, Bitov ingeniously draws upon Russian literary models, especially that of Nabokov, in order to parody and satirize the stifling society about him, as well as Russian literary tradition.

    • ↠ Pushkin House || ↠ PDF Read by ë Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov
      479 Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Pushkin House || ↠ PDF Read by ë Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov
      Posted by:Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov
      Published :2020-07-12T15:12:59+00:00

    About " Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov "

  • Andrei Bitov Andrei Bitov

    Andrei Bitov is the author of Pushkin House, Captive of the Caucasus, and The Monkey Link, among other works He is a cofounder of the Russian PEN club and has received numerous awards and honors, including being named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government He lives in Moscow and St Petersburg.

  • 442 Comments

  • A flawed and groping book - a book whose writer is obviously uncomfortable with his usually-well-fitting coat of fictional convention, and has added some patches. So there are 100 pages of explanatory notes, an essay on Russian literature delivered within the narrative, and various other hallucinations/diversions. At the same time, Bitov is careful to execute his more straightforward passages with conviction. Pushkin House reminds me of Hermann Broch's The Sleepwalkers in this way: the realistic [...]


  • Reading this book took some effort, to say the least. It was, to me, completely incomprehensible at various points, but for some reason it was confusing in a way that led me to want to determine why, and thus led me to turn the page. The plot or non-plot is as dreary and fun as St. Petersburg itself, and its incomprehensibility redolent of something Nabokovian, showing us beauty and hope for humankind in the possibility of numerous interpretations and in simple wonder at the possibility for life [...]


  • Dar ve yerel bir göndermeler sistemine sahip, bu göndermeler sisteminin çerçevesine uygun anlatımlar ve diyaloglar dışında öyküsel ve kurgusal olarak zayıf bir eser. Başarılı çevirmeninin de, her ne kadar kötü bir çeviri diyemeyecek olsam da, yazarın kurmaya çalıştığı postmodern, göndergesel dili okuyucu dostu kılmak adına pek bir şey yapamadığı görülüyor. Kitaptan tanıtımlarında belirtildiği gibi derinlemesine bir Rus edebiyatı incelemesi bekleyenler de y [...]


  • I wrote an essay on this book at university. It was one of my favourite books. I'll have to re-read the book to freshen my mind on the subject. If you're contemplating reading it I highly recommend - full of that peculiarly Russian literary style of combining philosophy with literature. I spent half my time reading it re-reading whole passages to better grasp a philosophical point Bitov was making. I loved the narrator voice as well. So very godlike and yet a Greek chorus. Sorry I can't be more [...]




  • Grea carte. Unii văd o înrudire între “Casa Puskin” de Bitov si “Petersburg”-ul lui Andrei Belîi. Faptul că ambele romane se hrănesc din universul literaturii ruse mi se pare prea putin, pentru înrudirea clamată. În ce mă priveste, în această Casă a lui Puskin am încercat să intru si pe usi, si pe ferestre Am reusit doar să dau la o parte niste perdele, să mut niste scaune. In Petersburg-ul lui Belîi am intrat cu toată fiinta mea si am iesit alt om. Sub pretextul unei [...]



  • I hesitate to give this a full four stars, primarily because this edition maybe suffers from the diminution of authorial voice that I'm increasingly convinced is inevitable when reading literature in translation? It's a big stubborn, difficult, philosophical novel that dances around what it means to live in a literary culture so inescapably dominated by state authority. I say dances around, because in 1978, one was still not free to write with any honesty about nearly anything with the long, hea [...]


  • Эту книгу невозможно описать – ее нужно просто прочитать. Невероятный постмодернистский (простите) роман. Текст-игра, текст-слоеный пирог. Гениальная, легкая, насыщенная, плотная, умная, заумная и зубодробительная книга. Блестящий язык.«Тот сел на стул, все еще чему-то не ве [...]


  • A dense read but worth the trudge. ETA: After fishing through my notes from that reading period I had noted:- painfully tries to be intellectual- real genius is not forced- purposeful obfuscation- addictive. Just when you want to dent a wall with it along comes a thread and a thoughtSo maybe I should down this to 3 from 4*:O)





  • Post Your Comment Here

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *