Devil's Consort

Devil s Consort A riveting novel of Eleanor of Aquitaine s early adult years from the author of The Virgin Widow Orphaned at a young age Eleanor Duchess of Aquitaine seeks a strong husband to keep her hold on the

  • Title: Devil's Consort
  • Author: Anne O'Brien
  • ISBN: 9780778304272
  • Page: 468
  • Format: Paperback
  • A riveting novel of Eleanor of Aquitaine s early adult years from the author of The Virgin Widow.Orphaned at a young age, Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, seeks a strong husband to keep her hold on the vast lands that have made her the most powerful heiress in Europe But her arranged marriage to Louis VII, King of France, is made disastrous by Louis s weakness of will and fA riveting novel of Eleanor of Aquitaine s early adult years from the author of The Virgin Widow.Orphaned at a young age, Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, seeks a strong husband to keep her hold on the vast lands that have made her the most powerful heiress in Europe But her arranged marriage to Louis VII, King of France, is made disastrous by Louis s weakness of will and fanatical devotion to the church Eleanor defies her husband by risking her life on an adventurous Crusade, and even challenges the Pope himself And in young, brilliant, mercurial Henry d Anjou, she finds her soul mate the one man who is audacious enough to claim her for his own and make her Queen of England.

    • [PDF] ✓ Free Download ☆ Devil's Consort : by Anne O'Brien À
      468 Anne O'Brien
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Download ☆ Devil's Consort : by Anne O'Brien À
      Posted by:Anne O'Brien
      Published :2020-06-16T02:09:40+00:00

    About " Anne O'Brien "

  • Anne O'Brien

    Librarian Note There is than one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread for information My home is in the Welsh Marches, although much of my early life was spent in Yorkshire, most recently in the East Riding.Ann O Brien The Marches is a remote region of England, surrounded by echoes from the past Hereford is close with its famous Mappa Mundi and chained library.So is Shrewsbury, and also Ludlow with its splendid castle and its connections with our Plantagenet and Tudor kings With my husband, I live in an eighteenth century timber framed cottage, which itself must have seen much history over two hundred years.I have always enjoyed the appeal of History.I taught the subject with enthusiasm but it became my ambition to write historical romances My first novel, The Runaway Heiress, was published by Mills and Boon in 2004.This first book was a Regency Romance in the great tradition of Georgette Heyer who has not admired her skill and delicate touch for the period I have drawn on my interest in the Stuart century to write about the English Civil War and Restoration England of Charles II Living in the Marches however I soon discovered the wealth of atmosphere and legend in this isolated part of England from medieval times It was not long before I was encouraged to create a medieval romance inConquering Knight, Captive Lady.When not writing, I have a large rambling garden where George and I grow organic vegetables and soft fruit or perhaps I should admit that he grows them whilst I pick and cook them We have a wild garden, an orchard, a formal pond and herbaceous flower borders We share it all with rabbits and pheasants, frogs and goldfinches, hedgehogs and buzzards It is a beautiful place When we first settled into our cottage I planted a herb garden on a Tudor pattern with stone pathways and clipped box hedges From this I developed my interest in herbs and their uses.Nicholas Culpeper s The Complete Herbal, a fascinating resource to a historical novelist first published in 1649, has become essential bedside reading As a result the use of herbs in medicine and witchcraft, for both good and ill, has appeared in some of my novels.For pure relaxation I enjoy yoga as well as singing with a local Choral Society Watercolour painting allows me to simply sit and appreciate the landscape and the flowers in my garden, when my mind is busy constructing my next plot.

  • 155 Comments

  • I decided to pick this up to read hoping it would give me insight to Eleanor Of Aquitaine's "early" life. What a disapointment to say the least.The first part of the book covers Eleanor's rule as Duchess of Aquitaine and Queen of France,which to me felt skimmed over and insubstantial. The author portrays her at age 14 but it felt like she was 21 years old! (as it is told in the first person's voice) For 14 she was awfully "worldly" in all manners of life including the bedchamber14? I also got re [...]


  • 3.5 StarsEleanor of Aquitaine seems to be the historical “it” girl of 2011 and adding to the bevy of books on her is Anne O’Brien’s novel, Queen Defiant. This is truly one of the reasons why I love the historical fiction genre: you can read so many varied books on any one person and they all bring something new to the table. In Queen Defiant, O’Brien chronicles Eleanor’s life from the death of her father, through her time as Queen of France and her unhappy marriage to the ineffectual [...]


  • Author O'Brien's very fanciful take on Eleanor of Aquitaine begins in 1137 as Louis of France arrives to claim his young and oh-so-wealthy bride. Louis brings Eleanor to Paris, and she's immediately turned off at the filthy, smelly, uncouth and ever-so-tacky Frankish court (Aquitanians being gracious, classy and the artibers of everything in good taste). You will be constantly clubbed over the head with this throughout the novel just so that you don't forget it. Louis would rather be on his knee [...]


  • This is the third book by Anne O'Brien I have read recently, and I have found her to be a very readable author - far better that the dull Gregory, if you want my opinion! All three of the novels I have read have been written in the first person, which is a narrative technique that I don't generally care for as it often feels too contrived and limits the point of view (see Philippa Gregory!). However, O'Brien, for me, has managed to pull this off and the first person narrative works for her and g [...]


  • I won't lie: finishing this book was truly hard for me. I bought it on impulse, during a visit to London, because I found it on sale; but after reading it and Virgin Widow by the same author, which I liked a little more but did not find fantastic either, I fear Anne O'Brien's books are not exactly my cup of tea.I gave this book two stars because I tend to give one star only to the books I found completely awful, and this one wasn't. The first 200-300 pages were quite enjoyable, but after that my [...]


  • Whilst this is in many ways a typical historical romance and is full of the stereotypes and clichés of the genre (lips curling, bosoms heaving, puissant knights, and the heroine sinking obligingly and predictably into the hero’s arms) it is nevertheless an entertaining read. It’s well-paced, full of well-researched historical detail and conveys an accurate picture of the time and the characters. It follows the early life of Eleanor of Aquitaine up until she arrives in England and although i [...]


  • I thoroughly enjoyed this novel despite it being one of the class of "trashy"historical novels, in the vein of Phillipa Gregory. It tells the story of Eleanor of Aquitaine from the beginning of her first marriage to Louis VII of France through to her second marriage to Henry Plantagenet and being crowned Queen of England. I know very little, unfortunately, about the history of this period, and what I do know of Eleanor I have gleaned from watching the excellent "The Lion in Winter" starring Pete [...]


  • So, funny story. I bought a copy of The Devil's Consort without looking at the synopsis and the cover (local indie bookseller recommendations FTW), thinking it's another Philippa Gregory. Instead, as you can see, the cover said, "Better than PHILIPPA GREGORY" like it could read my mind. Mildly apprehensive but buoyed by the tagline of "England's Most Ruthless Queen", I settled in to read a book where I knew I wouldn't stop making comparisons. Despite my negative (and totally wrong) preconception [...]


  • 20/12/2013Although this novel is flawed in some ways and is not necessarily historically accurate, it provides some insights into Eleanor of Aquitaine's early life.For the most part the book focuses on her marriage to Louis VII of France, more monk than king, and her awfully dull existence in this (assumed) near sexless marriage. The author gives credence to gossip about alleged affairs to relieve Eleanor's excruciating boredom. However, these salacious snippets did not enhance the novel.The sec [...]


  • As a pretty dedicated Philippa Gregory fan, the stamp "better than Philippa Gregory" didn't do much to entice me. It seemed a little crass in all honesty, and did not do the book any favours.Unlike Philippa, Anne covers Eleanor of Aquitane's first marriage to the King of France. Phillipa deals with Eleanor's second marriage.Both books are brilliantly written in their own right, and both give an amazing view on what was an incredibly cunning and resilient woman. I would be resistant to try and co [...]


  • I'm not sure how much artistic liberty was taken in creating this fictionalized account of Eleanor of Aquitaine's life, but it made for an interesting story. This is the first book I have read by O'Brien, but I will probably check out the other(s) she has written. I had only ever known of Eleanor of Aquitaine as the wife of Henry II of England. It was interesting to learn all about her life and first marriage before she married Henry. She had a great deal of courage to fight for her annullment f [...]


  • 1.5 stars.Not as rage-inducing as The Virgin Widow, but I still didn't like it very much.I'm starting to see a trend with Anne O'Brien's central heroines - they're defiant, stubborn, have an opinion and loudly proclaim it, and are resourceful. This trope failed in The Virgin Widow, but it works better (slightly) in Queen Defiant, partly because that's what the historical Eleanor was.As I stated in the beginning, Queen Defiant wasn't as rage-inducing as The Virgin Widow. One reason is that I don' [...]


  • Eleanor, Dutchess of Aquitaine and Gascony, has grown amidst splendor, education, and culture in her home lands. The king of France arranges a marriage between her and his son, Louis the Sixth, in order to acquire her regions and secure an heir for his son. While Eleanor looks forward to the marriage, she soon learns that her husband–a second son more fitting a position in the church than as a future king–is reluctant to fulfill his roles as a husband and ruler.Years of frustration and bored [...]


  • I have read many a book on the Plantagenet's both Fact & fiction and this Fictional piece did not disappoint. I do love the story of Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine and found this book although not the most accurate still a good read. A riveting novel of Eleanor of Aquitaine’s early adult years from the author of The Virgin Widow.Orphaned at a young age, Eleanor, Duchess of Aquitaine, seeks a strong husband to keep her hold on the vast lands that have made her the most powerful heiress in Eu [...]


  • I was very kindly sent this book by Simon from BookRabbit as I had read and reviewed Anne O'Briens last book which I enjoyed immensely, and I have to say this was just as gripping. I loved it, all about Eleanor of Aquitaine, a person I knew very little about to start with, but who I now know more about and would like to learn more! The blurb on the back of the book makes you believe that Eleanor was ambitious beyond belief, but I really have to say that was not the way she came across in the act [...]


  • This book was such a pleasure to read. Both the American and the British titles suit it perfectly. I've read a lot of Philippa Gregory's books and Anne O'Brien can give her a run for her money! Eleanor is such a fantastic character, admirable but selfish, very well-rounded. I loved the chemistry between her and Henry Plantagenet and grew to thoroughly hate her first husband, Louis, who was also such an odd but believable character. You can tell when reading that you're getting a lot of the facts [...]


  • Eleanor of Aquitaine is someone I knew very little about until I read this, and I feel certain that I've got a better idea of her now. She certainly seems to have been a remarkable woman, very aware of her own value as a wife and an ally (although these were basically the same thing at the time).The book is fairly well structured, and obviously very well researched, but I can't help feeling that it's just not terribly well written all the same. The prose feels clunky, dry, and in need of a good [...]


  • A fascinating study of a remarkable queen - Eleanor of Aquitaine. Trapped in an unhappy marriage to Louis VII she uses her beauty, her considerable courage, her manipulative skills and her political astuteness to escape and enter into a second marriage with Henry II - Henry Plantagenet. There are quite a few books centred around Eleanor. I feel Anne O'Brien's version stands among the very best of them. Highly recommended.


  • I wanted to like this book more than I did and I'm still not sure why it didn't 'click' for me. My bookshelves are full of historical novels and romances, most of them set in the Middle Ages, so I thought I would love this one. It might have been because it was written in the first person, which is not my favourite, but I have read others written in the first person and enjoyed them.I knew a little bit about Eleanor of Aquitaine before reading the book but I had never heard of her going on Crusa [...]


  • A mediocre novelisation of the story of a remarkable woman. Very little character development. Eleanor reads the same even though the story spans nearly twenty years. Things really lost it for me though when O'Brien tried to bring love into the storyline with Henry. It came out of nowhere and felt incredibly contrived. This was a marginally better effort than the last of O'Brien's books I read but not by much. It wasn't through any change in the writing - just as full of ridiculous descriptions [...]


  • I'd probably say this was better than The King's Concubine once it finally got going. The first half of the book is really slow and it's only from when the Crusade begins that it speeds up. Big chunks of time are skipped along in a few pages, for instance the Crusade is summarised in less than a chapter. Eleanor is often very similar to Alice in the King's Concubine as a narrator and in some places it's hard to tell them apart. The first half of the book is about 2.5 stats and the second is more [...]


  • Great novel portraying the feisty Eleanor of Aquitaine, including her frustration during her frustrating marriage to Louis of France and her relationship with Henry Plantagenet (Henry II) until she becomes Queen of England.One can sympathise with her frustration being married to a man who was better suited to the church than ruling the Kingdom of the Franks, despite Louis' claims that he loved Eleanor.Once I started reading Devil's Consort I couldn't put it down once I reached the part about the [...]


  • I have never read a book about Eleanor but after this one I wonder why I waited so long. What a fascinating woman! Since this is a work of fiction O'Brien does give her take on the rumours surrounding her. Because like all historical books we just do not know and have to make the best of what we do know. Though she sure made me believe I was there.Eleanor of Aquitaine was married to Prince Louis of France when she was 15 and he was 17. He was raised in a monastery and would rather have wanted to [...]


  • After reading The Virgin Widow, I had high hopes for Anne O'Brien's future historical novels. I thought she was off to a great start in the genre and had plenty of promise. While I think that promise was definately delivered upon in her follow up novel, Queen Defiant, I have to admit that it bugged me just a little bit. Queen Defiant is yet ANOTHER novel about Eleanor of Aquitaine. While I know that she's a fascinating woman, I think that I have just been Eleanor-ed out. I've read no fewer than [...]


  • While I was reading this book I just knew I would give it five stars, but towards the last 75 pages or so I decided on four stars. I have to say that I could not put this book down, and almost enjoyed every single word from cover to cover. This is the first book I have read about Eleanor, and I am glad I picked Anne O'Brien's story. In Anne's writing Eleanor is practically a comedian, she is hysterical! Despite the fact that this is the 1100's and no woman is seen as strong as a man or with as m [...]


  • A lot of novels about Eleanor of Aquitaine focus upon her tumultous marriage to Henry II, yet in this novel the focus is upon Eleanor's first marriage to King Louis of France and her subsequent pursuit of an annulment. It gave great insight into who Eleanor was as a person and why she made the decisions she made. She wasn't portrayed as a promiscuous woman as she so often is, nor was she portrayed as selfish. She was truly unhappy with Louis and sought to escape from a life of perpetual boredom [...]


  • This is about the young life of Eleanor Of Aquitaine covering her young years when she is wedded at the tender age of fifteen years to seventeen year old Louis VII Of France. Louis had been raised a monk until he was elevated to the throne by the untimely death of his older brother. Louis is unable to pull away from the monkish ways he had been raised too. He is no ruler, no warrior and certainly no lover. While he pursues the life of a monk, the young and vibrant Eleanor soon becomes bored stif [...]


  • As a historian-in-training, Eleanor of Aquitaine is in my wheelhouse. I love reading about her, her life, her exploits and how amazing she was. I have read, however, a few other novels that are set in Eleanor's pre-Henry II days and this, while significantly better researched, is a bit oddly pieced together. I wasn't terribly fond of the way the author handled the most significant part of Eleanor's life as Queen of France: when she went on Crusade. I felt that that part was skimmed over when it [...]


  • I liked this particular account of the early life of Eleanor of Aquitaine. Usually she is painted as either a love-obsessessed, airheaded idiot who brings all her misfortune down upon herself or as the most devious, cold-hearted, scandalous woman in all of Christendom. This particular novel strikes a nice balance between the two, showing Eleanor to be a young woman with little guidance and good counsel who makes a number of mistakes, but learns quickly as she goes along. By drawing a more realis [...]


  • For a book about such an awfully interesting woman this book could be awfully boring at times. The amount of tell and not show, and awkward time keeping, only made that worse. It was only the last third which kept it from receiving a 1 star. Perhaps it would have done better with a harsher editor; one who cut more of the unnecessary parts that slowed things down. The length wouldn't matter so much if things were actually happening other than Eleanor's self-pity and constant whining. For a woman [...]


  • Post Your Comment Here

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *